Good news: Blood plasma of survivors can treat coronavirus patients

Good news: Blood plasma of survivors can treat coronavirus patients

The new study suggests that the blood plasma of recovered coronavirus patients can apparently be used for infected patients as a process of treatment. This kind of new therapy is based on a medical concept called "passive immunity." The blood plasma of recovered patients develop antibodies that circulate in the blood and can neutralize the pathogen, which can be really helpful in healing.

When infused this plasma into a patient, it may increase people's disease-fighting response and boost their immune systems.  "The recovered people could have in their blood something that could be very useful," said Arturo Casadevall, chair of molecular microbiology and immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Since no drugs or vaccines are right now available to treat coronavirus, this plasma theory called "convalescent plasma," could provide short-term relief to a medical system. But, it is debatable on how many people this single theory can go on to treat.

The researchers have to first collect blood plasma from the survivors of the virus, develop tests to measure the levels of antibodies and then test it to determine if it is likely to be potent against the disease and deliver it to patients.  New York announced that it would soon begin implementing this theory based treatment in patients struck with covid-19 and Mount Sinai Health System in the state announced that it plans to begin transfers of antibody-rich plasma from recovered patients to people who are severely ill.